The Magazine of Corporate Responsibility

Recent Stories rss

Conflict Minerals and Firms’ Ignorance Over Their Supply Chains(0)

September 20, 2016

Since the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act of 2010, American law has required publicly traded companies to detail their sources of so-called “conflict minerals.. Academic research finds that almost 80 percent of firms were unable to determine the sources of the minerals in their products while only one percent could certify their products free of conflict minerals “with great certainty.”

Full Story»

Amazon Says It Puts Customers First. But Its Pricing Algorithm Doesn’t.

Amazon often says it seeks to be “Earth’s most customer-centric company.” Jeffrey P. Bezos, its founder and CEO, has been known to put an empty chair in meetings to remind employees of the need to focus on the customer. But in fact, the company appears to be using its market power and proprietary algorithm to advantage itself at the expense of sellers and many customers.

One Man’s Leadership Toward a Goal: ‘The Great Mission of Business Ethics’

Columnist Gael O’Brien examines the achievements and contributions of a man – W. Michael Hoffman (pictured left) – and the Center for Business Ethics at Bentley University, which he founded 40 years ago. “Legacy goes beyond a name on a building,” O’Brien writes. “It’s the sustained passion that connects with and energizes the passion of others sharing a mission.”

Testing an Organization’s Purpose in the Face of Adversity

A May 2015 explosion in one of its largest facilities tested Johnsonville Sausages’ organizational purpose and commitments made to its employees. Author Dan Pontefract takes a look at how Johnsonville reacted to that crisis and what lessons there might be for other companies. “Organizational purpose is the opportunity for a firm to define its principles, ethics, leadership and culture,” he writes. “It is imperative for the organization to act on this definition.”


More in this category