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The Work Culture at Amazon: Does the Tin Man Have a Heart?(0)

November 13, 2015

Recent criticisms of what’s reported to be a high-pressured work environment at Amazon highlight how leaders’ expectations can dehumanize a workplace, writes columnist Gael O’Brien. “It is difficult,” she says,”to see how a company passionate about ‘customer obsession’ won’t give more attention to its own culture – finding ways to listen and respond to those who make customer satisfaction possible and sustainable.”

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For Big Railroads, a Carload of Whistleblower Complaints

Big railroads are often targeted by complaints of illegal retaliation against whistleblowers who disclose safety hazards or report on-the-job injuries. A recent $1.25 million damage award to a former BNSF Railway Co. employee spotlights what critics say is the unjust punishment sometimes meted out to railroad workers who report injuries or safety problems.

Inside Corporate America’s Campaign to Ditch Workers’ Comp

Workers’ comp was founded on the premise that employers owed a duty to injured workers and their families. And laws in every state require them to pay workers’ medical bills and some of their lost wages until they recover — or for life if they can’t. An investigation by ProPublica and NPR looks at one Texas lawyer who is helping major companies opt out of workers’ compensation and write their own rules. What does it mean for injured workers?

Volkswagen’s Next Challenge: Keep Scandal from Happening Again

Columnist Gael O’Brien says Volkswagen’s confession to rigging emissions standards on millions of diesel cars means the company’s board and new CEO, Matthias Müller (left), need to understand and correct what made it possible for illegal and unethical choices to be made when obstacles to business goals surfaced. What prevented anyone from speaking up or if anyone did, from being heard? And what are leaders willing to do to change that?

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