The Magazine of Corporate Responsibility

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International Labor Standards and Corporate Supply Chains: An Interview with Richard Locke(0)

February 27, 2014

“We live not just in a global economy but in a global supply chain,” says international labor expert Richard Locke. “The most important thing is to educate consumers, especially in large markets, so they understand that the choices they make have implications for issues of living standards, working conditions and justice in the factories that produce most of the things we buy every day.”

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Trying to Break the Sweatshop Business Model

One of the most persistent corporate responsibility issues for many global brands is how to manufacture products in less developed countries while paying fair wages and maintaining acceptable working conditions. The New York Times reports on an experiment by a U.S. clothing company that is paying factory workers in the Dominican Republic a “living wage” – three times the average pay of the country‚Äôs apparel workers.

GlaxoSmithKline, Merck, Novartis Top Access to Medicine Report

The Access to Medicine Index seeks to rank pharmaceutical companies based on their efforts “to enhance global access to medicines.” The report cited particular problematic medical areas including a need for new pharmaceutical products to address neglected tropical diseases and the lack of viable markets for pediatric HIV/AIDS drugs.

Businesses Confront the Water Quality Challenge

For many in the so-called developed world, the ability to turn on the tap for clean, fresh water to drink, cook and wash with is taken for granted. The stark truth, however, is that over a billion people in the world have little choice but to use potentially harmful sources of water. What are companies doing to respond? And is it enough?


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