The Magazine of Corporate Responsibility

Tag Archive for ‘Ethics’

Plagiarism: Why Some Smart People Do Some Very Stupid Things

When U.S. Senator John Walsh (pictured left) was accused of plagiarizing a masters thesis, he initially attributed the act partially to post traumatic stress disorder related to military service. He later recanted and quit the race for his seat in the Senate. The Army War College has since rescinded the masters degree. “The consequence of plagiarism,” writes columnist Gael O’Brien, “is like a time-released capsule imploding at a vulnerable moment in a career.”

The Ethics of Intrusion

This essay by Christiana Whitcomb was awarded First Prize in the 2014 Elie Wiesel Foundation Prize in Ethics Contest.

Hi, My Name is White Foreigner: An Essay on Being the Other

This essay by Katelyn Edwards won an Honorable Mention in the 2014 Elie Wiesel Foundation Prize in Ethics Contest.

The Invisible & Voiceless: The Plight of the Undocumented Immigrant in America

This essay by Alejandro Camacho won an Honorable Mention in the 2014 Elie Wiesel Foundation Prize in Ethics Contest.

The Silenced Voice: Examining the Evolving Debate on Pediatric Cochlear Implantation

This essay by Jennifer Hu was awarded Second Prize in the 2014 Elie Wiesel Foundation Prize in Ethics Essay Contest.

Exploring the Ethics of National Loyalty: The New Compromiso – Mexican Students Abroad in the U.S.

This essay by Alejandro Camacho is the Third Prize winner in the 2014 Elie Wiesel Foundation Prize in Ethics Contest.

Will Controversy Over Whales and Dolphins Threaten SeaWorld’s Future?

Questions about how SeaWorld Parks and Entertainment treats dolphins and whales has placed it at the center of an intense controversy involving allegations of cruelty to animals – charges the company vehemently refutes. Columnist Gael O’Brien examines the debate and interviews Thomas I. White, an advocate for animal rights and a professor of business ethics.

American Apparel: Sex, Power and Terrible Corporate Governance

Efforts by American Apparel’s board to oust founder and CEO Dov Charney don’t impress columnist Gael O’Brien. It’s one thing to tolerate a philosophy that a sexually-charged workplace fosters creativity, she writes, but another to allow “the repugnant behavior of its leader, who sexualized the workplace as a stalking ground for employee relationships called consensual, disregarding disparity of age and power.”

‘Why Do Good People Do Bad Things?’ The Role of Spiritual Intelligence

What accounts for behavior? There are people with a high IQ – an intelligence quotient derived from standardized tests – and those strong in what psychologists call emotional intelligence. But a third factor is often overlooked, writes columnist Gael O’Brien. Spiritual intelligence may be “harder to measure, easier to misunderstand and often dismissed as something more suitable for a yoga studio than a board room,” she says, but we ignore it at our peril.

Learning to Do the Right Thing – Right Here, Right Now

Educating students in corporate responsibility means making sure they think critically and recognize that ethical issues are inherent in all business decisions, says an educator. “Corporate culture must support all employees to think critically about every decision and action, every day,” she writes. “Being motivated simply to avoid prosecution is not the same as behaving ethically—and it’s often not even a good way to avoid sanctions.”