The Magazine of Corporate Responsibility

Tag Archive for ‘Gender Diversity’

Google Controversy Highlights Challenge of Building Community

When a Google engineer recently wrote and distributed company-wide a memo about women in technology, intense controversy followed. Columnist Gael O’Brien says situations like the one at Google should prompt more companies to ask some critical questions: What does community mean for us? What do we want it to look like and why? What will enable our efforts to be successful and sustainable?

Why CEOs Need to Make Gender Diversity on Boards Happen

With greater gender diversity on a corporate board, comes better performance. Opinions differ as to why, but myriad research studies from leading academic institutions and the private sector all make a compelling case for more balanced gender representation on boards. The debate should be long over, yet women’s presence on U.S. corporate boards remains frustratingly, persistently low.

Gender Composition of Boards Important for Competitiveness

A top Ernst & Young executive says that by not recruiting more women to corporate boards, U.S.-headquartered businesses are encouraging a “brain drain,” as women join the boards of non-U.S. competitors. It’s time, she says, for corporate leaders in America to “take advantage of the power of diverse views from leaders who don’t think, act or look like themselves.”

Women Advancing to the C-Suite: Why So Difficult?

For women seeking to advance in greater numbers to CEO and board roles, gender diversity continues to move at a tortoise pace. At Fortune 500 companies, women still represent only 3.6 percent of CEOs and hold only 16 percent of board seats. Improving on that, says columnist Gael O’Brien, will require a leadership of engagement.

Why You Need to Retain Women: The Business Case for Gender Diversity

Author Caroline Turner suggests that enrolling others in creating a culture of inclusion requires that you present a clear business case that fits your industry and organization. “It requires,” she writes, “that the leaders of your organization understand the business value of inclusion and gender diversity.”