The Magazine of Corporate Responsibility

Tag Archive for ‘GM’

The Conflict Between a Corporation’s Global Standards and National Law

China’s extensive state censorship is just one example of the challenges that companies frequently confront when doing business globally. In an excerpt from his new book, former GE legal counsel Ben W. Heineman, Jr. examines the “recurrent dilemma” confronting businesses when a corporation’s global ethical standards collide with national law.

Corporate Values in Action: How They Make a Difference

“A shared sense of values can create a ‘we’ powerful enough to head off crises, transform organizations and propel strategic business decisions,“ writes columnist Gael O’Brien. She takes a look at three different organizations – a Fortune 500 company, a family-owned regional business and an online company – to see how values could affect challenges each will confront in 2015.

Why Thanksgiving Day Store Openings Are Bad Business

Major U.S. retail chains like Target and K-Mart are being criticized by some consumer groups for opening on Thanksgiving Day. Columnist Gael O’Brien finds she agrees with the critics. In the rush for short-term profits, she says, companies are “losing capital” with their employees and damaging their reputations as responsible corporate citizens.

Grappling with the Challenges of the ‘Purpose Journey’

Columnist Gael O’Brien continues her look at the “purpose journey” and what it can mean for individuals and organizations. While having purpose helps, it also brings obligations. “The dark side of purpose,” she writes, “is that once you start talking about it, you can’t lead wearing blinders because accountability for impact comes with the territory.”

GM’s New CEO: Demonstrating How Less Can Be More

Since taking over the top job at General Motors in January, Mary Barra has been low-key about the fact that she’s the first woman ever to lead the giant auto maker. And that is a good thing, says columnist Gael O’Brien. “Because there are so few women CEOs,” she writes, “there is a danger that in celebrating them we can go too far — celebrity status conferred on, cultivated or accepted creates a rock star status which when associated with leadership has real risks.”