The Magazine of Corporate Responsibility

Tag Archive for ‘Leadership’

Internal Survey Shows the Red Cross’ Own Employees Doubt the Charity’s Ethics

A survey of American Red Cross employees shows a crisis of trust in the charity’s leadership and deep internal doubts about the Red Cross’ commitment to ethical conduct. In response to the statement, “I trust the senior leadership of the American Red Cross,” just 39 percent responded favorably.

Plagiarism: Why Some Smart People Do Some Very Stupid Things

When U.S. Senator John Walsh (pictured left) was accused of plagiarizing a masters thesis, he initially attributed the act partially to post traumatic stress disorder related to military service. He later recanted and quit the race for his seat in the Senate. The Army War College has since rescinded the masters degree. “The consequence of plagiarism,” writes columnist Gael O’Brien, “is like a time-released capsule imploding at a vulnerable moment in a career.”

Olympic Lesson for Business: Failure Can Build Resilience

Olympic athletes “remind us that no one is too big to fail and rather than fear it, they train themselves to acknowledge mistakes, find out how to correct them, and try again,” writes columnist Gael O’Brien. “It is a lesson of resilience that makes everyone a winner. And it works in board rooms as well.”

GM’s New CEO: Demonstrating How Less Can Be More

Since taking over the top job at General Motors in January, Mary Barra has been low-key about the fact that she’s the first woman ever to lead the giant auto maker. And that is a good thing, says columnist Gael O’Brien. “Because there are so few women CEOs,” she writes, “there is a danger that in celebrating them we can go too far — celebrity status conferred on, cultivated or accepted creates a rock star status which when associated with leadership has real risks.”

Leadership: When the Boss Offers a Shoulder to Cry On

A good boss helps create an environment where employees can succeed. But that dynamic can grow complicated when employees have issues that blur the boundary between work and home. “What, if anything, is owed when a boss offers help if personal problems or negative emotions affect an employee on the job?” asks columnist Gael O’Brien. “Does good leadership merit a quid quo pro?”

Lessons Learned from the Financial Crisis

On the fifth anniversary of the Lehman Brothers’ bankruptcy, columnist Gael O’Brien says the biggest takeaway of the 2007-8 financial meltdown may be how leaders misjudged the “footprint” of their institutions and the impact they can have on “bystanders” – a community, a country, and potentially countries around the world.

Case Study: The Search for Great Leadership

If you were selecting a new president for your organization, what leadership qualities should he or she possess to be successful in navigating all the challenges you can foresee and those you can’t? Columnist Gael O’Brien discusses an unusual symposium of leading educators who offered advice to The Ohio State University as it goes about the process of identifying a new president.

Richard Branson and ‘The B Team’ Plan for Corporate Responsibility

Columnist Gael O’Brien takes a look at a new corporate responsibility initiative launched by entrepreneur billionaire Sir Richard Branson and a team of 14 other global leaders. “Is the timing right?” she asks. “Is all this enough to create a tipping point where leadership priorities shift and the triple bottom line becomes a universally accepted and honored business practice?”

OSU President’s Departure Raises Questions About Leadership Values

The sudden resignation of Ohio State University President E. Gordon Gee from his $2 million-a-year job followed disclosures of so-called jokes he’d made about other universities and their leaders. Columnist Gael O’Brien says the incident raises questions about leadership vulnerabilities among the most seasoned of executives and how their boards respond,

When CEOs Self-Destruct: Lessons in Values for the Corporate Board

The forced resignations of executives at Lockheed Martin and Best Buy – along with the resignation of CIA Director David Petraeus – raise questions about the values boards reinforce with their leaders. Columnist Gael O’Brien says many critical qualities – emotional intelligence, authenticity, self awareness, and stakeholder-focus — are often not included in the process.