The Magazine of Corporate Responsibility

Tag Archive for ‘UBS’

House Finance Chair Goes on Ski Vacation with Wall Street

In January, Rep. Jeb Hensarling, R-Texas, ascended to the powerful chairmanship of the House Financial Services Committee. Six weeks later, campaign finance filings and interviews show, Hensarling was joined by representatives of the banking industry for a ski vacation fundraiser at a posh Park City, Utah, resort.

Beyond Barclays: Laying out the Libor Investigations

Controversy continues over the British bank Barclays, which has been slapped with $450 million in fines and penalties for manipulating information used to set a critical interest rate. Here’s some background on the scandal, and how we’ll likely see government action on other banks besides Barclays.

What’s Happened to the Big Players in the Financial Crisis?

Widespread demonstrations in support of Occupy Wall Street have put the financial crisis back into the national spotlight lately. So here’s a quick refresher on what’s happened to some of the main players, whose behavior, whether merely reckless or downright deliberate, helped cause or worsen the meltdown.

Banks Funding Destructive Mountaintop Removal Mining

Many major banks invest in companies that engage in the environmentally destructive practice of mountaintop removal (MTR) coal mining, whereby the tops of mountains are removed by explosives to expose thin seams of recoverable coal. Despite some banks’ stated intent to limit such financing, a Sierra Club/Rainforest Action Network “report card” indicates that few are yet walking the talk.

In Postcrisis Report, a Weak Light on Complex Transactions

Reporter Jesse Eisinger credits the Financial Crisis Inquiry Commission’s just released report for being full of fascinating information and detail. Its biggest failing, he suggests, “is its timidity in engaging the most important question looming over the crash: What did Wall Street know and when did it know it?”

Banks’ Self-Dealing Super-Charged Financial Crisis

Over the last two years of the housing bubble, Wall Street bankers perpetrated one of the greatest episodes of self-dealing in financial history. Faced with increasing difficulty in selling the mortgage-backed securities that had been among their most lucrative products, the banks hit on a solution that preserved their quarterly earnings and huge bonuses: They created fake demand.