The Magazine of Corporate Responsibility

Tag Archive for ‘Zappos’

The Work Culture at Amazon: Does the Tin Man Have a Heart?

Recent criticisms of what’s reported to be a high-pressured work environment at Amazon highlight how leaders’ expectations can dehumanize a workplace, writes columnist Gael O’Brien. “It is difficult,” she says,”to see how a company passionate about ‘customer obsession’ won’t give more attention to its own culture – finding ways to listen and respond to those who make customer satisfaction possible and sustainable.”

Leadership: Bold New Programs Need Strong Foundations

Columnist Gael O’Brien examines two ambitious initiatives in leadership and corporate social responsibility – at Starbucks and Zappos – and wonders whether they are taking on too much or simply doing what’s necessary to develop bridges to a sustainable future. “We need more leaders to have big, out-of-the box ideas that have the potential to transform business and society,” she writes. At the same time, “change, even for the noblest purposes, needs to take hold internally and locally and build slowly owned by many.”

Corporate Values in Action: How They Make a Difference

“A shared sense of values can create a ‘we’ powerful enough to head off crises, transform organizations and propel strategic business decisions,“ writes columnist Gael O’Brien. She takes a look at three different organizations – a Fortune 500 company, a family-owned regional business and an online company – to see how values could affect challenges each will confront in 2015.

John Mackey’s ‘Conscious Capitalism’: ‘Simply a Better Way to Do Business’

In a new book, Whole Foods Market CEO John Mackey envisions a world where “one day, virtually every business will operate with a sense of higher purpose, integrate the interests of all stakeholders, elevate conscious leaders, and build a culture of trust, accountability and caring.”

Employee Recruitment: Why Human Resources Matter

For the longest time, human resources professionals have shoved the relationship between the promise of corporate social responsibility and hiring the “right candidate” under the carpet for fear of “more work” as well as a real fear of muddling what is an already complicated process at most large companies.