The Magazine of Corporate Responsibility

Tag Archive for ‘CEOs’

When CEOs Self-Destruct: Lessons in Values for the Corporate Board

The forced resignations of executives at Lockheed Martin and Best Buy – along with the resignation of CIA Director David Petraeus – raise questions about the values boards reinforce with their leaders. Columnist Gael O’Brien says many critical qualities – emotional intelligence, authenticity, self awareness, and stakeholder-focus — are often not included in the process.

CEO Pay: ‘Time to Retire the Rock Star Messiah Myth’

Pay packages for CEOs of U.S.-based companies continue out of control, writes columnist Gael O’Brien, with boards often succumbing to “fear-based” compensation practices that undermine the potential for collaborative leadership and sustainability. She notes new research which disputes conventional wisdom that CEOs can easily move to the next company if not paid well. “Tackling excessive CEO compensation,” O’Brien writes, “is the first step in creating a new normal.”

In-touch Boards: Reaching Out to the Value Critical Stakeholders

Corporate governance expert Paul Strebel says the repeated failure of boards to intervene early enough to avert corporate disasters reflects a serious problem in the boardroom that cannot simply be swept under the carpet: boards are out of touch often with those who can make or break a company.

That’s No Way to Say Goodbye: The Business of Firing a CEO

The sudden dismissal of a chief executive has seemingly become commonplace practice at big companies. But columnist Gael O’Brien says the firing of a CEO and how he or she leaves their position often reveals a lot about them, their bosses, and their organization. In the end, she writes, “shareholders aren’t served by blame games.”

Women in the Boardroom: Should the U.S. Have Quotas?

Columnist Gael O’Brien says the U.S. has failed to show leadership in gender diversity on corporate boards, raising questions about what it can learn from other countries that have imposed quotas for women directors. While quotas can stir up discomfort, she writes, there’s a “complacency, even smugness” about boardroom diversity in the U.S. that argues in favor of requiring companies to take action.

Women in the Board Room: Change Comes Slowly

Mounting documentation on the extent of gender inequity has brought with it the attendant media attention that opens boardroom doors. As a result, writes columnist Gael O’Brien, the work of Nominating Committees has been moved into the public domain. Politicians, governments, investors, activist groups and others are saying things have to change.

Opinion: When Women Rule the C-Suite

I have a theory. It is that once women rule the “C-suite,” corporate social responsibility (CSR) will become the norm for U.S. business. Why? Call me sexist, but I think that helping others is a function of nurturing and comes more naturally to women than it does to men.

Women Lack Numbers and Influence on Corporate Boards

A new report from The Corporate Library finds that while almost 90 percent of S&P 500 companies have at least one woman board member, there are far fewer women directors at smaller companies, and even at larger companies “women are typically a small minority and hold few positions of responsibility.”